AngularJS JSONP GET Example

AngularJS JSONP GET Example

This is an example of a cross domain GET request using JSONP, the most common way to get data. Like the previous example using CORS, this too uses requires the server to be ‘aware’ of request so it can reply with the JSONP callback method.

The “P” in the JSONP actually stands for padding, which really means “Named Function”. You pass along a named javascript function that tells the server to wrap its response and when it responds your data is neatly wrapped with a helper function. This gets around the Same Origin Policy since <script> tags are ok’d for cross domain execution, which is how we can include JS libs from CDNs and other sources.

This method does require control over the request destination, or the site itself has to support a JSONP callback. This is just a javascript function returned from a ‘black box’, so there are some serious security concerns (but you’re not sending sensitive data via GET, right?). Also, we should note that this method have VERY limited support for reporting errors. Most people work around this by timing a response check and timeouts (which someday we may blog about).

AngularJS CORS example using httpbin.org

AngularJS CORS example using httpbin.org

This is an example of a cross domain GET and POST request to a server with CORS headers enabled. It’s a very simple one field form that displays the echo’d response from httpbin. I chose httpbin since I knew it had CORS headers enabled, and seemed like a relatively simplistic tool to play around with.

As the code shows, GET requests are quite simple and look like a regular $http call. The heavy lifting is all done by the server

The POST request on the other hand is a little more complicated and requires some manipulation of the headers before the request itself.

First, we need to set the Content-Type to form-urlencoded to let the destination know we are posting form data:

$http.defaults.headers.post["Content-Type"] = "application/x-www-form-urlencoded";

Second, we need to delete a header called “Requested-With” that is sent along with AJAX requests:

delete $http.defaults.headers.common['X-Requested-With'];

Also, to stop this mistruth from spreading any farther: A lot of blog posts about Cross Domain posting with Angular will show you this code:

$http.defaults.useXDomain = true

It’s not a real config value, you don’t need it. Seriously. Try it with and later without it, you won’t see a difference (I think the dojo toolkit may require it, I’m not sure how it made it’s way into multiple AngularJS examples).

D3 & MeteorJS

A talk John and I gave on D3 & MeteorJS at our last MeteorJS LA Meetup. We touched on some D3 basics, and discussed some challenges we faced integrating it with MeteorJS.

code available at: https://github.com/ArroyoLabs/meetups

demo: http://d3demo.meteor.com/