Docker + xdebug

Presenting various ways to setup and configure your docker container with xdebug and how to integrate with your IDE.

Debugging, an issue that all developers should live with.

There are several strategies we can use to manage debugging, from stopping execution after dump / print the content of the variable we want to inspect (I still with this more often that I’d like to admit) to more sophisticated tools or web-server  modules.

Okay, it does not enough complicated so, now let’s add DevOps. Yeah, if you want to use a tool like xdebug (here is a great tutorial about how to install it Remote PHP Debugging with Xdebug) within Docker containers.

Some questions came to my mind when I stumbled upon this situation: How do I setup the container? How can I expose xdebug outside of my containers? How can I integrate remote debugging with my IDE workflow?

Well, I don’t have the answer for all this questions, but I will show some examples and tips various ways to setup xdebug inside your docker container and connect it with PHPStorm.

Creating Docker container

This step is pretty much the same for all alternatives and OS platforms. Here we will discuss the very basic settings to create a container.

My example will be based on a clean Erdiko project, so I already have the structure to test, umm debug, some code.  To try out the container clone from github, https://github.com/arroyolabs-blog/docker-xdebug

So let’s start creating a custom Dockerfile that will look like this:

FROM php:5.6-fpm
MAINTAINER Leo Daidone <leo@arroyolabs.com>

RUN apt-get update && apt-get install -y \
    libpq-dev \
    libmemcached-dev \
    curl

# Xdebug
# here is the installation
RUN pecl install xdebug \
    && docker-php-ext-enable xdebug
# here I'm copying the config file we will discuss in the next section
COPY ./etc/xdebug.ini /usr/local/etc/php/conf.d/

RUN usermod -u 1000 www-data

CMD ["php-fpm"]

We need to create this file instead of use the official php:5.6-fpm image, because we need to run the pecl install command within the created container. Note that I also copied “xdebug.ini” from etc folder, both, folder and file should exists in the same directory as Dockerfile, otherwise you will need to change the source path to the real location of your custom “xdebug.ini”. I choose this way because I think is easier to maintain an .ini file instead of a bunch of bash command.

Now we will need a docker-compose.yml to orchestrate the whole setup. Let’s break down the example below:

version: '2'
services:
  data:
    image: busybox
    volumes:
      - ../:/var/www/code
      - ./nginx/:/etc/nginx/conf.d

  web:
    image: nginx
    volumes_from: [data]
    links:
      - fpm
    ports:
      - "8088:80"

  fpm:
    build:
      context: .
      dockerfile: Dockerfile-PHP
    volumes_from: [data]
    environment:
      PHP_IDE_CONFIG: "serverName=docker"

I’ve defined three services, data, a busybox with the only purpose of mount and map volumes that will be shared by the other services. One web service that is an official Docker nginx image, the web server I will use in this example, finally, fpm, that will be based on our previous Dockerfile and where we will discuss variations in the next section.

Note that I’m not exposing the 9000 port (the default xdebug port) in any of Docker settings. This is the first trick for Linux, do not expose the port, just use it. That way when you try to use you IDE, you will not see an error like

Can't start listening for connections from 'xdebug': Port 9000 is busy.

Setting up xdebug

xdebug.default_enable=1
xdebug.remote_enable=1
xdebug.remote_handler=dbgp
; port 9000 is used by php-fpm
xdebug.remote_port=9000
xdebug.remote_autostart=1
; no need for remote host
xdebug.remote_connect_back=1
xdebug.idekey="PHPSTORM"

This is the basic configuration I use with the Docker code defined in the previous section. It should work fine on Linux boxes, but I found some issues trying to run it in Mac OS. I will show you some changes I tried that worked on both OS.

First issue I found when I tried to make my project works on Mac was the ports’ binding and interfaces. How can I overcome the port busy error?

After some tries I found a nice trick, I recommend, add an alias to our interface with static IP.

In Mac:

sudo ifconfig en0 alias 10.254.254.254 255.255.255.0

In Linux:

sudo ip addr add 10.254.254.254/24 brd + dev eth0 label eth0:1

Now in order to use this new static IP, we need to add this two new lines in our xdebug.ini:

xdebug.profiler_enable=0
xdebug.remote_host=10.254.254.254

I suggest set to zero all other lines except for “remote_enable” and of course “remote_port“.

Finally, our docker-compose.yml shold looks like this:

version: '2'
services:
  data:
    image: busybox
    volumes:
      - ../:/var/www/code
      - ./nginx/:/etc/nginx/conf.d

  web:
    image: nginx
    volumes_from: [data]
    links:
      - fpm
    expose:
      - "9000"
    ports:
      - "8088:80"

  fpm:
    build:
      context: .
      dockerfile: Dockerfile-PHP
    volumes_from: [data]
    environment:
      PHP_IDE_CONFIG: "serverName=docker"
      PHP_XDEBUG_ENABLED: 1 # Set 1 to enable.
      XDEBUG_CONFIG: remote_host=10.254.254.254

Note that now I’m exposing “9000”, this is because I’m using a different IP address to bind this port. Also I’ve added two new environment vars, one to enable xdebug and other to set the remote host address.

Configuring you IDE

As I mention above, I’m going to use PHPStorm to show you how to setup a Debug client. For practical purpose it will be separated in two sections, the first one based on Linux approach, and other for Mac.

But first let me start with common steps for all platforms:

you will need to go to Settings ( linux shortcut: ctrl+alt+s; Mac shortcut: Cmd+, ) and check in Language & Frameworks / PHP / Debug looks like the image

linux_xdebug

After that go to DBGp Proxy and follow the steps for each platform

preferences

Linux example

Since you are using localhost (127.0.0.1) and xdebug has PHPSTORM as ide_key those two values can be empty here:

linux_dbgp

now you have to go to Debug configuration:

server_dropdown

with the green plus sign, add a new PHP Remote Debug, change Name to docker, fill Ide Key field, and click on periods to add a new server

linux_remote

after you click on periods this new window will be opened. Again, click on green plus sign to add a new server that will be named docker, fill all field as it’s being shown, including Use path mappings check, this is a very important step, you need to let IDE know how to related docker path with local path.

linux_servers

Mac example

Assuming here you are using the tweak settings with IP alias, the steps are the same as linux, just need to change values for the one in screenshots:

preferences_2

run_debug_configurations

Note this time Host field is not 127.0.0.1 but the new alias IP.

servers

Finally, to start debugging just click on the phone icon and green bug icon

server_dropdown

add some breakpoints and happy debug!

 

Thanks for reading, I hope you have enjoyed this article and don’t miss our next entry where I will bring you a tutorial about PHPdbg, and how to use it with Docker.

Remote PHP Debugging with Xdebug

Introduction

In our previous posts, we discussed how to use some tools to explore and debug legacy code. This blog post will explore one of these tools that I personally use quite often in depth: Xdebug and Remote Debugging.

We’ll explore the installation, the required settings tweaks, and some basic tools and workflows to get you started. The least fun and hardest part of this whole process is the installation.

Having xdebug up and running will speed up your code investigations and will really help you dig into troublesome code. It will also give you the best insight into code you aren’t familiar with works without resorting to die statements and var_dumps for small windows.

Development Only

Please only install this on your development and staging environments! Do not install this on any public facing server!

Remote Debugging

I want to take a minute and explain the concept of remote debugging with Xdebug. Until a few years ago, I would install XDebug only to get the “pretty error printing” features. While these features allowed some better control over how I was viewing errors and my var_dump results, it really added nothing I critically needed. Remote debugging now makes XDebug a short list of ‘need to install’ things when setting up a new environment.

Xdebug offers mechanisms to allow you to set breakpoints in your code to stop it’s execution and view the current state. This means you can say “stop here and let me take a look around at what the code is doing at this moment” on the server itself. You actually connect to the server and can poke around, set some conditional break points (where you stop execution when a variable is set to a certain value) and even evaluate some raw PHP on the server given certain conditions.

To accomplish this, you must connect a debugging tool to your server with a specified and exposed port and talk to it using a protocol provided by XDebug. Your debugger is the tool you use on your machine, XDebug is the tool/port/settings collection you use to connect to your server.

If this sounds like the basic IDE debugging tools you have used with other languages like C++ and JAVA (and also like something overcomplicated for being such a normal feature for other development stacks), it should. It’s pretty much the same thing. The biggest difference here is that this was not a widely used debugging method for hosted PHP. I’d like to help change that with this blog post.

Installing the Xdebug Extension

The xdebug project and github page offer some installation instructions that feel woefully lacking. Also, they offer little advice tailored to individual setups and environments. I’ll try and provide some examples of common installation methods.

Please note that these methods assume you are installing on the same server you host your development environment that serves the PHP code you wish to debug. This means, if you are running a vagrant box or docker container to host your code, install xdebug on this server instance. If you host your locally code on the same machine you are edit and maintain the code on, install xdebug on this machine. See the section above for some clarification on remote debugging.

All of these instruction assume you have administrator access and some level of comfortability with the *unix command line. If you do have access to your server in this capacity, or you are not comfortable with running these commands, you might want to find a grown up to help you.

pecl / pear

You can install Xdebug extension with the pecl tool and then tweak your php.ini file to include the installed extension. The official docs recommend this route first actually. The installation instructions are the same with the pear tool as they are for pecl. I have found this is the easiest installation method if you are running your server on a MacOS environment.

After you are sure you have pecl installed, run this command on your command line.

pecl install xdebug

apt-get / yum

If you are running your server on an Ubuntu/Debian/CentOS machine, you can install the xdebug with your specific package manager.

sudo apt-get install php5-xdebug

or

yum install php5-xdebug

Homebrew

This is a method I have never tried personally but I know there are some recipes specifically for installing xdebug with homebrew.

From what I read, you will need to add the homebrew-php repository and install this from the command line as well. Check out this repo link for more information.

Compiling it yourself

Another method I have never tried personally, but I know its possible. If you are want to do this yourself, you might be beyond the scope of this post. I’ll just point you to the project page for the most up to date information.

Update your php.ini file

Find your newly installed php extension and add this line to your php.ini file

zend_extension=“/usr/local/php/modules/xdebug.so”

Replace the “xdebug.so” file with whatever your tool installed. It’s also safe to create a symlink with the filename “xdebug.so” as well. If you have trouble finding this file, try the following command to find the extension file:

find / -name ’*xdebug*.so’ 2> /dev/null

Verifying your XDebug Installation

Restart apache and create a test file called test.php with the following lines of code and load it into your browser:

<?php

phpinfo();

Search for “xdebug” and you should see something like this in your browser:

image

If you see a line that looks like the one highlighted above, congrats, you have installed xdebug!

Port Forwarding

You will need to expose some ports on your server to allow connections from your debugging client. How you accomplish this will certainly depend on your individual environment setup, but I would like to note this to save you the time I lost trying to find out why I could not connect.

And we will explain the port you will need to be expose and forward in this next section…

Xdebug INI Settings

Here are some of the INI settings you will need to update in order to enable remote connections. These settings will be found in your php.ini file, or a possible xdebug.ini file if one was created by your install method.

  • xdebug.remote_host
    • This setting allows you to specify an address where you debugging client is connecting from.
    • In most cases, this will be set to “localhost”, but may differ in your development environment.
    • This setting is ignored if xdebug.remote_connect_back is set to TRUE. See more info below.
  • xdebug.remote_autostart
    • This setting enables remote debugging, turn this on!
  • xdebug.remote_port
    • This setting allows you to specify a port for your debug client to connect to the remote server with. You will need this value when configuring your remote debugging tool.
    • This is typically set to 9000 but you can update this to any port that isn’t being used if you feel contrary.
  • xdebug.var_display_max_children
    • This setting allows you to specify the amount of array children and object’s properties are shown when you use a var_dump or use your debugging client’s function trace tool.
    • By default this is set to 128, but you can set it to -1 if you want to remove the limit entirely.
  • xdebug.var_display_max_data
    • Like var_display_max_children, this setting allows you to set a  maximum string length that is shown when variables are displayed in var_dumps or function traces.
    • By default this is set to 128, but you can set it to -1 if you want to remove the limit entirely.
  • xdebug.var_display_max_depth
    • Another setting that allows you to set a limit when using var_dump or function tracing, but this one sets the nested levels of array elements and object properties displayed.
    • By default, this is set to 128, but again if you live dangerously you can remove the limit entirely and set it to -1.
  • xdebug.scream
    • Setting this value to true will disable the @ (the “shut up”) operator entirely.
    • This is super useful when you find out when you predecessor was just hiding a critical error behind the @ operator and you can finally go to be because you found the elusive notice showing the variable was never set in the first place and you had no idea and thats why you can’t get the page to load when you don’t have a cookie set in IE 9.
  • xdebug.remote_connect_back
    • Setting this value to true will allow you to connect and attach a remote debugging client to your server from any address.
    • This setting is great for shared development environments but is quite dangerous since it will just allow anyone to connect who tries. YES, anyone.
    • Also of note, this will override the xdebug.remote_host setting.

Remote Debugging Tools

Editors

PHPStorm & SublimeText

While I personally like to use the stand alone tools, I do know a lot of people who prefer to use these editors to remote debug.

While I’m sure a cursory google search can lead you to some better instructions on how to install and configure these tools, I thought it was worth mentioning since a lot of people use these tools and they offer the remote debugging tools you might want to use.

Stand Alone Tools & Helpers

MacGDBp

This is a tool I use on an almost daily basis. Its relatively small and lightweight, and gets out of the way when I am done. I also mentioned it in our last blog post. I do need to note that this tool does not seem to be updated frequently and occasionally crashes without warning. That being said, I still highly recommend it.

Chrome Xdebug Enabler

This is a simple chrome extension that allows you to toggle the xdebug remote debugging cookie for a given URL. This is great to quickly start and stop a remote debugging session.

It’s pretty much an unobtrusive button that lives in chrome. I would install it now if I were you.

Conclusion

I barely touched the surface of remote debugging using xdebug, but I hope I inspired you to install and configure it now. Stop using var_dump and die statements and debug like a grown up!